Tuesday, 30 September 2008

What's the best badminton racket for me?

This question crops up all the time all over the internet and at badminton clubs all over the world. Because a badminton racket is a personal choice it is quite difficult to answer. We are all different, with our own unique styles, so to actually pinpoint a certain racket for a certain player is going to be hard.

That said, it is possible to give a very basic outline of which racket should be more suited to certain types of players. As far as attempting to recommend an actual racket model for a player, it is always going to be subjective. If you add the extra variables of string tension, weight, grip size, flexibility and balance, then it is almost impossible to fit an exact badminton racket to an exact player type. The fact that you can also customise racquets makes it even more difficult because you can change some of the above variables with nothing more than a piece of tape. The decision of what racket to buy will ultimately come down to you, and what suits you best of all. Forget what anyone else tells you, they don't know your game like you do. This is why i cannot tell you what specific racket to use. However, what i intend to do is give a little list of what racquets, in general, should suit different player types.

Please do not take what i am going to say as gospel, it is just a rough guide to perhaps point you in a general direction. See, i am beginning to regret making this post already, and i haven't even started yet! I guess this post will be more aimed at beginners, or players who need a little bit more information to help make a decision of which badminton racket to choose.

There are many different player types such as the power player, who wants to hit the cover off the shuttle at every opportunity, the touch player, who can put the shuttle wherever they want. There are defensive players, who actually want you to smash at them so they can blast the birdie back at you or place your hardest smash to anywhere they want with a casual flick of the wrist. And there are players who can do all of the above, the all rounder who seems to be able to do everything. The question is, what kind of rackets do these players play with? Is there a common trend between player style and racket?

Well at the professional level there does seem to be a trend towards stiff flexibilty, head heavy balance and high string tension. I have touched on this in a previous post. However, we are not all professional players, so what do we all use?

Well i will use myself as an example. I would describe myself as a bit of an all rounder, with a preference more towards touch and control. I can smash when i need to, but i like to make my opponents run around before i do this. I am 37 years old, and have been playing for around 25 years. I have played county badminton in the UK for many years and i would say i was at an advanced level. I am in no way trying to brag about how good or bad i am, but it would seem a little foolish to write a blog about badminton rackets if i was a beginner, what kind of credibilty would i have to give you advice? All the stuff i write is based on my own experiences with using all kinds of rackets, and if it helps any of you, then i am doing what i set out to do.

Now, what kind of racket do you think would suit my game? I use the Carlton Airblade Tour, which Carlton actually stopped making a few years ago, but you can still buy them if you know where to look. Here is where the fun starts. Looking at the Airblade spec on the internet, one store says this racket weighs 78g and another says it weighs 86g. Looking at some reviews, one person says it is too light, another says it is too heavy. One person says it is too flexible, another says it has a stiff flex. What the hell is going on here? Everyone is saying something different, how do you know what the truth is? See the problem?

From my own experience with this Airblade, i would say it has a stiff flex, and the weight is more likely to be closer to 86g than 78g. However, my regular readers will know that my racket has been modified, and i reckon it weighs in at around 96g. It seems way too heavy to use, but it isn't, not to me anyway. The balance before modification is even, after, it is head light, in fact it is about as head light as i can get it. I have this strung at around 25-27lbs tension.

Does this kind of racket suit my play? Well if i am looking for control, then the higher string tension and stiff flex will help me, so this is on the right track. As far as power goes, i will need to generate this myself, the racket is unforgiving with the string tension and flex. So what i gained in control, i have lost in terms of power. However, the modification of lead tape on the handle will give me more power for the same effort. But, this extra weight has made this racket a bit less responsive in fast, reaction type rallies. So for a control player this will be a hinderance. The truth is that this has been the case. I am getting used to it though, but i needed to do this to prove my little experiment would work.

Can you see the problem here? I have just told you what racket i use and what i have done to it. Does this help you decide which racquet you should choose? Would you go out and by a Carlton Airblade Tour, based on what you have just read? Can you relate your game to mine?

Here is another example. I could go out and buy myself the top Yonex badminton offering, which right now is the ArcSaber 10. Is this the right racket for my style of play? Well, the Arcsaber is stiff, and has a head heavy balance. The balance will help me get a bit more power on the smashes, but in time it will destroy my shoulder. The stiff flex will help my control shots. The weight is the same as my Carlton. Could i play with this racket? Of course i could. If i did buy it, the first thing i would do would be to add my lead tape and make it head light, and then string it at my own tension. I would be happy to play with it. Would it improve my game? No. Why? Because i would have changed it's characteristics to the same kind of spec as my Carlton was. The only difference would be a bit more weight in the racket head, as this is what this bat came with.

So what kind of racket should you use? I can only give you a pointer, because i have no idea what you are going to do with your racquet once you have it. The badminton manufacturers like to think they know what racket will suit which player, and they make them accordingly, or do they? Ok, most retailers will tell you that if you are an advanced offensive player, you need to have a stiff flex racket. These people assume if you are an advanced player then you can generate power yourself, you just need the control that stiff, or extra stiff ratings can give you. Does this mean that i could not use a racket with a medium/ flexible rating? Of course not, i could just make a flexible racket have more control by stringing at a slightly higher tension. I would have more control then. Strings are everything.

Almost every top end badminton racket has a stiff flex rating. They cost the most money because the manufacturers have added all the goodies, like titanium, nano technology, kevlar etc, to make them stiffer. So, the general rule is that advanced players need stiff flexibility. Intermediate players need medium flex, and beginners need flexible rackets. Offensive players need head heavy balance, defensive players need even/ head light balance.

The problem is that it does not work like this. Seriously, if you have a racket and you don't like the feel of it, or the balance, then just modify it before you rush off to try the next best thing that promises to take your game to another level. Experiment with string tension if you feel you lack control or feel. Change the balance with tape, or apply more or less overgrip to the handle to change the balance point. If you need more extreme measures, add lead tape for extra weight, either to the handle or the head depending on which type of balance you are after. The only thing you cannot change is the flexibility, so if you have bought an extra stiff top end Yonex racquet and you now find you are having problems hitting the shuttle from baseline to baseline, you may need to reduce the string tension, or add weight to help you get more power.

This is why you should be careful of extra stiff rackets. I know many people who have fallen for the marketing hype, and bought these types of racket, only to find they cannot use them. Use what you have already. If you are a power player and you have a fast hitting action, you don't have to use a stiff bat just because the manufacturers tell you to do so. You will get more power with a flexible racket. If you need control, then string at higher tension, with the same racket.

I think i am rambling on a bit here, so i apologise. But to try to put this all in context, this is what i would advise..

If i was a beginner/ intermediate player, and i was not too sure what kind of badminton racket would suit me, i would go out and buy myself a neutral bat. By neutral i mean, a medium flex, average weight, ie 85g, and an even balance. This would be my starting point. Bear in mind that as soon as you add your overgrip to the handle, you will have altered the balance. As far as the strings go, just use the factory strings to start off with. Go out and play with it and see what you think. You can change the balance all you want with more overgrip and tape on the handle if you like a head light feel. Or add tape to the head for a head heavy balance. This tape only costs a few pounds, so it won't break the bank.

Play some more with it. Perhaps start thinking about experimenting with string tension for control, or for a bit extra power depending on higher or lower tensions. Keep playing some more until you now know what kind of spec suits you best. Only when you have done this can you think about changing rackets, because hopefully you will now be able to know what you like best. After this you can go out and buy whatever you think will meet your requirements, whatever make or model it may be. The main factor is that you will be able to decide what you want, you will not need to read all these reviews because you will already know that it does not relate to you personally. You will also know all the little tricks to turn almost any badminton racket into one that you can use, and that suits your style.

50 comments:

Big John said...

Interesting idea, but probably not very safe. The lead tape will eventually leach through the grip and into the players palm with bad long term health effects. A better way to achieve the same goal is to attach a small weight to the end of the handle with a screw. I have found that a US quarter will move the balance point back about 1/2 inch on most rackets and make them head light. You can always add other coins to fine tune it.

I've tried it on both Yonnex and Wilson rackets and the results are as the author says. More maneuverable but with good smashing power.

antony said...

Hi John
This is a good idea, my playing partner has done this instead of adding the lead tape. It is probably a better idea, because the weight is all below the hand, which will help more with manouvering. The lead tape i added comes up the handle a bit, so this does affect how i can move the racket around. The Apacs Visible Hollow range would be great for this, as there is a hole in the shaft already, perfect for stuffing various coins in there!!

Arvind said...

I'm an intermediate player in india and was looking for some guidance regarding buying a new racket.
i like to think that am a power player:)
Your post was very helpful.I've decided to go for a Yonex Muscle Power 22 Light Badminton Racquet.
Thanks a ton.

antony said...

Hi Arvind
The Muscle Power 22 Light is actually described as an intermediate racket, but don't take that as a given. It has a flexible shaft so it should give you even more power. It doesn't cost that much, which is the main consideration when you are learning new skills. Just remember it's what you do with the racket that counts.

Anonymous said...

I am an intermediate player. I should say I am an all rounder kind of player.. but more defensive, like to place the shuttle into different corners of the opponent's court and occasional smashes on the right opportunity. I am quite a wristy player, with a wristy backhand too. Not too tall or bulky, so I guess that makes he have to work harder to generate power on smashes.

I am considering between the Yonex Nanospeed 9900 and Yonex Arcsaber Z Slash. What would you suggest?
Ron

antony said...

Hi Ron
Both of those rackets are designed for all round players, but both are pretty stiff, so you get more control but have to work harder to generate power. I guess it comes down to cost in the end.

Anonymous said...

Hi Antony,

I'd describe myself as an intermediate player, having played a lot some years ago and now just getting back into it. I picked up a cheap Halex racquet and broke a string after about 6 games. It's not worth restringing such a cheap racquet, so I am in the market for a new one. I don't want to spend much, but I don't want to break more strings immediately.

I'm considering the Yonex Muscle Power 3...is this too much a beginner racquet? I'm not concerned so much about the style it caters to as much as the durability.

Thanks in advance for your advice!

antony said...

Hi there

You could certainly try the muscle power 3. As you regain your skills you can then play with the string tension to give you more control, and a different feel.

Anonymous said...

Hi Antony,

Many thanks for your help. Between the Yonex Muscle Power 3 and the Futabaya Nano 9000, which would you recommend? Price difference is 20 USD ($30 for Yonex; $50 for Futabaya).

The Futabaya looks like the more advanced racket to me, but I wanted to see what you, the expert, think!

Thanks again,
Tyler

antony said...

Hi Tyler

Doi you have any details about the Futabaya racket? I have heard of them but never used any of their range.

Anonymous said...

Hi Antony,

Thanks for your reply. Here are some details on the Futabaya racket:

Frame: High Modulus graphite with Nano Technology

Shaft: Hi-Modulus Graphite, Med. Flexible

Length: long body 26 3/8 ínch

Tension: Main: 18-25lbs, Cross: 18-25lbs

Weight: approx. 84 +/- 2 grams (w/o string)

String: Pre-strung with 21G Titanium string @ ~ 22lb

I must say I'm drawn in by the titanium string (I assume it lasts longer), and if the Yonex is less sturdy or the string less durable, I would pay the price difference in getting it restrung. So I suppose I'm learning toward the Futabaya, only because it looks like more of an intermediate racket and not a beginner.

Apparently the price is low (list price is supposedly 120 USD) because the original cover of this batch of racquets was lost. Not sure I trust that, but the racket looks decent enough (purchasing from Amazon.com).

Thanks for your continued advice!

Best,
Tyler

antony said...

Hi Tyler

The Futabaya does look like a more advanced racket to me compared to the Yonex. If you are an intermediate player then i would go for that one. The string tension is quite low at 22lbs, but that is fine until you get used to playing again. You can always up the tension as you progress.

Strikerz said...

Hi, my name’s Danyal and I’ve got some serious things to get sorted out. For an overview I’d like to say that I’ve been playing for many years but never actually got serious about it, but now I’m really into it and for starters I thought I’d read your article, and honestly I’ve got an information overdose. So I’d like to clear something’s out. Please correct me where I’m wrong.

1. Power depends on two things the flexibility of the shaft and strings. Right? So for e.g. if I wanted an all round racket should to go for a medium stiff racket and string?

2. I’m a bit puzzled by what the head wait does and what adding weight to the bottom of the racket does (I know it makes the head light, but what’s the benefit?)

3. I like smashing where possible but I favor a placing game. One major fault in my game is that I can’t (despite all the power it put into the shot) get the shuttle from my baseline to the opponent’s baseline. Should I go for a flexible shaft and tight string or a stiff shaft and flex string?

4. And lastly, I’d like to get an intermediate racket (I need it to last some years because my budgets really restrained), I also need a light racket because I’m fairly skinny, so after all that I’ve mentioned, what configuration should my racket have ? I can then start scouting the internet for it.

antony said...

Hi Danyal

My advice is to get a flexible racket with low tension strings. If you cannot hit the shuttle from baseline to baseline then your best option is to make things easier for yourself by doing this. An even better option is to get some coaching so you can improve your technique. Without a sound technique you will always struggle, no matter what racket you have. Hope this helps.

Office Cleaning London said...

Hi Antony

I would say I'm an all-rounder but enjoy a smash when the opportunity presents itself. I'm not unhappy with my game but I'd like improve my control and accuracy. I currently have an old Carlton graphite racket and am looking to replace it. Although expensive I'm thinking of an Arcsaber Z-Slash as other reviews seem to indicate it would suit my style. Do you agree or do you think I'd be better looking at something else for accuracy and power? Many thanks.

antony said...

Hi there
I would look for something cheaper than a z-slash to be honest. Or even try increasing the string tension in your old carlton racket, you would be amazed how much difference some tight strings can make for control and accuracy.

Anonymous said...

THanks! I ended up with a Yonex ArcSaber Z-Slash ang a Li Ning N90 II!

Anonymous said...

Hey antony!

I really hope you reply. please!because I am debating on what to buy. YOu were really helpful, so i hope you can provide further assistance.

I am an okay player who plays in school. I am not quite sure what I am but I know im patient, like moving the birdy all around to make them run, and then occasionally smashing when the oppurtunity presents itself. I think I need more power in my smashes. I also think I need more accuracy.

I am debating on buying either the Yonex nanospeed 80 (2011), or the Yonex carbonex 8000 light. They are both decent priced at just over $50. Do you think they are worth the money? Which one do you think is the better choice? (I am leaning towards the carbonex- looks more professional)

I greatly appreciate your help!
Jason

agam said...

Hi my name is Agam i have played badminton for 6 yrs from the age of 10-16 regularly and later playing rarely but now have started playing again.

I am a bit skinny of 60KG and had bought nanospeed 9900 3 months back. As this time i am serious about my game and want to improve as much as possible.

Forehand clears are not a problem so power generated with the stiff shaft is OK. But i am lacking two aspects in the game one is back hand high clear and other is smash returns. also i would like to improve the power in my smash.

As nonospeed 9900 is head light it should help in smash returns and precession play.

I like to move my opponents around the court but try to power hit with smash when ever get the opportunity, and relay on it quite often.

The spring tension i am using now is 23lb.

please suggest what i can do to suit the racket to my needs. Also i am not very clear of the effect of spring tension can you please explain this.

Also suggest if a flex shaft type of racket will suit me then i will by a new one.

antony said...

Hi there

I think either racket would be fine for you. Since you are still at school and are learning the game, then really focus on improving your technique and your footwork. These two things will speed up your improvment more than the choice of racket. The best way to tell if the racket is for you is to ask the store owner if you can test them before you buy, ask if there are an ex demo rackets you can play with, then make your choice. Enjoy your game!

@Agam- The backhand clear is mainly due to the wrist action and being in the right position with your feet. The nanospeed is a pretty stiff racket, so you do need to have a strong wrist snap to send that shuttle around the court. Taking the shuttle as high as you can on the backhand clear will make things easier. The string tension at 23lbs is fine, it will help you gain some extra power due to the flex of the strings on impact. I will add a link to a previous post on string tension and racket flex when i find it.

Ben said...

Hello,
I would probably describe myself as an intermediate all round player. My current racket is a cheap beginner one, as I first took up the sport for a bit of fun. I like to smash when possible but also like control and to be defensive. I am a slim build. Could you please recommend me a racket that is not too expensive but still achieves my style.
Many thanks,
Ben

antony said...

Hi Ben

You should look for a "neutral" racket, or also known as an all round racket since you seem to have an all round game. Look for one with an even balance, and a medium flex. Don't worry too much about weight, although the cheaper rackets can tend to be a bit on the heavy side. What kind of price range are you looking for?

Ben said...

Hello,
thanks for the quick reply and the information,I know you said dont worry about weight but I would probably want one about 80-90 grams if possible. My price range would be upto about £40, have you any recommendations for type of racket and where.
Thanks,
Ben

Ben said...

Just in addition to the above comment, i have found the Yonex NanoSpeed 200 at amazon for about £30 including postage, would you say this is too much a beginners racket or about right?
Thanks,
Ben

antony said...

Hi Ben

I would go to racketworld, at http://www.racketworld.co.uk and look for Browning rackets. Browning are not so well known, but they do make excellent rackets, and the prices on racketworld are very cheap, right in your price range. I would have a browse through their Browning range, and if you need specific advice on the specifications, just send them an email telling them what you are looking for. Their service is top notch, and i have bought a few rackets from them myself. They also have a store with Amazon, and if you do a search on Amazon for browning rackets you will see them come up, along with real customer reviews, almost all of the reviews about their service are very good.

Ben said...

Thanks again for replying, I have loooked at the website and have found the following I believe would be suitable:
Carlton Aeroblade ISO FX Badminton Racket (although from reading your blog, it may not be too suitable for power as it is head light, do you agree), Wilson [K] Blaze Badminton Racket, Browning Oxylite Ti90 Titanium Badminton Racket OR Browning Nanoblade Ti Badminton Racket (seem similar but which would you recommend), Browning Oxylite Ti85 Titanium Badminton Racket.

From the above or any others you may recommend, what type of racket do you think would suit me best?

Many thanks,
Ben

antony said...

To be honest, i think most of the browning rackets are very similar, so just go with the cheapest. One piece of advice i will give you is this... you and the strings are the most important part of how a racket plays and feels. As you progress and learn better technique and footwork, you will then need to look at the string tension. Don't worry too much about the actual racket, all of those listed above and not too different in reality. Try and spend money on some coaching if you can.

khesei said...

hi anthony
i m a beginner player and got myself yonnex carbonex 8000 as starter. i would like to know is dis approriate 4 a player like myself. n would u also give me ne advice how i can improve my back-hand. i am a right handed player.
thanks casey

antony said...

Hi Casey

That racket is just fine for you if you are just beginning and learning new skills. The backhand is always the most difficult shot to master when you first start out, especially the overhead backhand from baseline to baseline. The key to this shot is to reach up and take the shuttle as high as you can. You also need a nice wrist snap at the end of the stroke, most backhand power comes from the wrist. Here is a good demonstration of how to do it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEcrhp58uUI it is is Chinese, but there are subtitles and there is a whole video series which is excellent. Hope this helps Casey.

Anonymous said...

hi krish here,
i have been playing since five months, but already beat players who playing since 2-3 years.
so i say my game is so and so about intermediate level.
my game is about moving the other person around,touch play,lot of wrist work,and drop shots. I am sort of weak in smashes. and want to improve on that. my question is should i buy something which assist me in smashing cause i don't want to spoil my game by taking the easy way out.


basically should we get a racket that enhances our strength or that which hides our weaknesses?



also please suggest a nonexpensive racket (60 $ at the max ) according to my game.

Anonymous said...

I would say im an intermediate and am a offensive power player. What is the racket that suits me?

antony said...

@anonymous

I would look at experimenting with your string tension before buying a new racket, the strings can make the biggest difference to how the racket feels.

nev said...

hi antony,

why don't an advanced player use a very flexible shaft so that his smashes will be godlike? since he is already good, he can still easily do controlled shots with the same racket right?

antony said...

Hi Nev

The theory goes that advanced players have a fast swing speed, and if they use a very flexible racket, then the racket will have already flexed past its optimum, which would cause a decrease in power. A stiffer flex would idealy flex at just the right point for maximum power. Or so the theory goes...

Sam said...

Hi Anthony,

I've just read your post and I agree with your point that its pretty much how your racket feels in your hand that is most important. However, I just want to ask quite a basic question. If I were looking for powerful smashes in my play, which kind of strings and tensions should I choose for my racket? By that I mean thin/thick and high/low tension. Thanks for your help! =)

antony said...

Hi Sam

There should be 2 posts which you can find from the links on the left side of this post. They are badminton strings part one and two. I would have included the links here but for some reason blogger is playing up.

Anonymous said...

Hi, am a beginner. got myself a cheap un branded raquet but not enjoying the game. what do u suggest i should buy - since am an entry level player - i do not want to spend a lot. also do not understand the difference between MP and carbonex series - any suggestions.
P.S i am a left handed player. :)

Anonymous said...

hi,i am a bit advanced player.i am goin to go for li ning or ashaway archblade 80(i dont know the name of the li ning bat)i am an all rounder but i like to play offensive.but my smashes arent so tough enough so should i think of another bat?like ashaway palladium xt 600?or yonex armourtec 150power?i have a head nano blast now.i dont think its suiting me.thanks for the advise anyway.

eduard said...

hi everyone... i'm a advance player seeking for comfortable racket. I owned an armortec 900p, and amazed with it, until I tried the voltric 80. so light hence so powerful. But less net play coz its hard to control for forehand drop shots near the net. would it advisable to add some weight in the handle so it will help little in net play?

Anonymous said...

hi, i'm a beginner player, currently i play with a Cosco CB-150E.
I am not much of a defensive player, i am an offensive player and i tend to smash a lot. what would be a better racket for control and power both, and ow good is my curent one?

antony said...

To everyone, thanks for the comments. I see a few of you are beginners and are looking for a racket to suit your level of play. A low level Yonex bat would be what i would go for, something with a flexible shaft is the best bet. Spend money on getting some coaching before buying an expensive racket.

@Eduard
The Voltric 80 is the most head heavy balanced racket that Yonex makes so it should give you more stability around the net for those spinning shots. Not sure if you are looking for more control, if so try stringing a bit tighter.

Anonymous said...

Hi there, I am an intermediate player and have been playing with voltric 80. I have been having upper arm pain. I am an all rounder player. Do you think I bought th wrong racket? I tried different sting tensions and also tried adding grip weight but nothing helps with my pain. Please advise. Than you.

Nirmal Sabu said...

between carbonex 8000 and nanospeed 100... which wud you recommend to an intermediate palyer???.. ns 100 is flexible while the carbonex is medium stiff.... since both of the these are head light racquets which will giv u power+control??

antony said...

If you are getting pain in your upper arm then something is wrong. It could well be your technique that is causing this problem. Go and find a coach to look at your technique, they may find something straight away.

@Nirmal
Either racket wil probably be just fine. If you are intermediate then i would certainly try looking at your string tension, it makes a huge difference to the feel of the shots without the need to change rackets.

Anonymous said...

hi antony

im just an intermediate level player, my playing style quite similar to Lee Chong Wei, control and smash when opportunity arise. i played badminton for 15 years...my old racket is Yonex carbonex 10 SP, i used it for 6 years. so earlier this year i thought it's time to get a new racket...

from 3 months ago, i started to try what kind of racket will suits me, although my style quite similar to LCW but surely our technique is different. it's quite an expensive experiment though...X-)

i bought Voltric 9 for starter to see if a how i feel on a head heavy racket. it's 3UG5. i bought i for MYR 320.00. after several session i found that it's not suitable to my liking. the head is too heavy for me. my defense became slower.

suddenly i found your blog 1 month later and thanks to your reviews i bought ES 10 and ES Z-Slayer. i bought both of them for only MYR 190. both rackets suits me very well, just slightly head heavy and the shaft not too stiff i think. i think i'll sell my Voltric 9...:-)

ES 10, Apacs Stern 66(if im not mistaken) 27lbs
ES Z-Slayer, Carlton AG68 26lbs

i feel the same way as u felt on ES 10...there is a bit vibration but that's not a big deal. both rackets are easier to maneuver and my defense back to normal. control is good and for power, although not good as my Voltric 9 but still enough to for me to clear to baseline and smash. the game is not won by smash only rite? overall i feel very satisfy with both of my ESs. considering the price, it delivers very well....

Zarul

antony said...

Hi Zarul

Thanks for reading my blog, i hope you find some interesting things on it. The Apacs rackets are all pretty good, especially for the price compared to the top end yonex rackets. It doesn't really matter what racket you use, just as long as you feel comfortable using it.

Anonymous said...

yes, i agree with you...
now i realize that there are a lot of brand of rackets out there...
now i think yonex and li-ning as BMW and Merc, i feel like they are selling their brand name but i wont deny the quality of the rackets...
but still i feel the racket is overpriced...
i also learned about some strategies for the game, string tensions and etc.
one more thing i love about apacs is because the recommended tension, my favourite tension is 25-27lbs which a yonex racket wont allow me to do so(except for Arcsaber with DX frame)....
a very nice blog, i learned a lot....
keep it up..

Anonymous said...

yes, i agree with you...
now i realize that there are a lot of brand of rackets out there...
now i think yonex and li-ning as BMW and Merc, i feel like they are selling their brand name but i wont deny the quality of the rackets...
but still i feel the racket is overpriced...
i also learned about some strategies for the game, string tensions and etc.
one more thing i love about apacs is because the recommended tension, my favourite tension is 25-27lbs which a yonex racket wont allow me to do so(except for Arcsaber with DX frame)....
a very nice blog, i learned a lot....
keep it up..

Zarul

Gpis said...

I would just like to confirm the idea of turning a head heavy racket into a head light racket by adding tape at the base.

I'm no major in Physics, but i strongly believe adding lead tape at the base of the racket will make it more wieldy. I agree that the balance point will move lower and by definition, make it head light. BUT i strongly disagree that it would be more wieldy for the following reasons:

1. The weight of the head is still the same. So if a heavy head racket has around 50g of weight at the head, putting lead tape at the base won't change the fact that you're still swinging 50g of the head weight. BUT if you stick the lead tape to the head of the racket (say, adding 2g to the head will really give you 52g of head weight), you'd get the desired result, which is making the head heavier, creating more force with any power stroke.

2. Putting lead tape will increase the total weight of the racket, making it more unwieldy. Using the example of a hammer, if i were to attach, say, another head of a hammer at or near the base of the hammer, again, it won't reduce the weight of the hammer's head in any way. And since you increased the total weight of the hammer, it would just end up being more unwieldy. In the end, adding weight at the base just made it more unwieldy by increasing the total weight.

So many would wonder what's the point of knowing the balance of the racket. In my opinion, i believe the balance point should be interpreted with the racket weight. Combining the the values will give you an idea how much of its weight was distributed to head. I also believe that head light racket for control can be turned into a head heavy racket for power by adding weight to the head. But turning a head heavy racket for power into a head light racket for control is impossible. You can turn it into being head light (by definition of balance point), but it can't be turned into something for control because its head weight still remains the same (it's still heavy. You just made the handle heavier).

This is how i see it. I would to know your perspective on this that would make sense why adding weight at the base makes it more wieldy.

Gpis said...

*I'm no major in Physics, but i strongly believe adding lead tape at the base of the racket will make it LESS wieldy.